Favorite Performances of 2015

FAVORITE PERFORMANCES OF 2015

Another year down. Another string of stellar performances. This time, I decided to go against ranking based on gender. There's also no "lead" or "supporting" categories, since the Oscars already pull that nonsense and this is simply about highlighting quality work across the board. So, here are my 15 favorite performances of 2015. All have given me a reason to cheer. All are worth gushing over.


by Jericho Cerrona January 24, 2016


Anne Dorval, Antoine Olivier Pilon, Suzanne Clément Mommy

Dorval is the unraveling widowed mother, Pilon the psychologically unstable son, and Clément the damaged former school teacher living across the street in 25-year-old wunderkind Xavier Dolan's ambitious melodrama. The results are a trifecta of powerhouse acting.

Bernard Pruvoust Lil' Quinquin

Bernard Pruvoust's bumbling Commandant Van deer Weyden may be investigating a series of mysterious murders in Bruno Du Mont's wonderfully droll Lil' Quinquin, but he could just as well be putting on a classic comedy workshop. Raising his huge eyebrows, providing pratfalls, and unfurling dialogue with a distinctly bizarre delivery, Pruvoust absolutely owns every scene. The year's most oddly endearing character by a wide margin.

Nina Hoss Phoenix

As a former Jewish nightclub singer who survived the Holocaust with reconstructed facial surgery intact, Nina Hoss gives a heartbreaking, vanity-free performance as someone essentially playing the role of her former self in Christian Petzold's powerful drama-noir. Hoss's unique gifts; of being able to tell us a multitude of emotions through simple gestures and a knowing look, is everything.

Joshua Burge Buzzard

Joshua Burge's performance as Marty Jackitansky, the power glove-wearing drone working for a dreary Michigan Bank Mortgage department in writer-director Joel Potrykus's Buzzard, is crucial to understanding what the film is going for. With his greasy hair, bulging eyes, nebbish demeanor, and stoned poker face, he creates a character bordering on mental illness who nevertheless remains oddly sympathetic. Plus, no one can eat an entire bowel of spaghetti quite like Burge.

Kitana Kiki Rodriguez, Maya Taylor Tangerine

As formally exciting as Sean Baker's lo-fi experiment is; (complete with a tricked-out iphone 5), there's little doubt it be as compelling without Kitana Kiki Rodriguez and Maya Taylor's undeniable chemistry as two trans-sex workers running around Los Angeles. This isn't really "acting" so much as reacting and observation; with both Rodriguez and Taylor going all out with high-strung physicality, comic vulgarity, and even most winningly, moments of genuine warmth.

Elisabeth Moss Queen of Earth

Tapping into how those with genuine depression often view reality, Elisabeth Moss is ferociously committed to Alex Ross Perry's cause as a woman gradually losing her grip on reality. Because of her multi-layered approach; at one moment euphoric, while in the next descending into a fetal position of teary-eyed panic, Moss is in many ways playing an alien visitor trapped in a world which can never truly understand her.

Gregg Turkington Entertainment

Existing as a bold corrective to the idea that movies need sympathetic protagonists, Rick Alverson's jet-black ramble into the American wasteland has at it's center a towering performance from comedian Gregg Turkington. Playing a variation on his real-life standup alter-ego Neil Hamburger, Turkington concocts an inedible impression of a man both hostile and withdrawn; a ghost drifting through dingy bars and cheap motel rooms who just might make you laugh before gouging out your eyes.

Lea van Acken Stations of the Cross

Dietrich Bruggermann's formal experiment is composed of 14 shots representing the 14 stations of the cross of Christ, and young actor Lea van Acken is virtually in every frame. Her feverish, wide-eyed performance as Maria, who takes a messianic burden upon herself while struggling with extreme fundamentalist upbringing, is phenomenal in its restraint. With nowhere to hide because of Bruggermann's static tableaus, Acken is forced to carry the entire film, which she does with an incredibly naturalistic power.

Bel Powley The Diary of a Teenage Girl

The story of 15-year-old Minnie's coming-of age in Marielle Heller's touching film is so free of sentimental tropes that British actress Belle Powley is allowed the uncommon freedom to inhabit a female character unapologetically enthusiastic about sex. This is personified through contradictory, unformed, but nevertheless honest reactions to subject matter that could have come across exploitative. However, Powely never makes us feel guilty for investing in Minnie and a key sequence where she stands examining her naked body in front of a mirror, is a literal and metaphorical representation of her fearlessness.

Michael B. Jordan Creed

As the illegitimate son of Apollo Creed, who died in the early rounds of Rocky IV, Michael B. Jordan exudes charisma, wit, and a physical tenacity that's matched only by writer-director Ryan Coogler's reverentially muscular new perspective on the Rocky franchise. Without the actor's keen understanding of portraying a young man determined to forge his own legacy, this could easily have fallen into cliche, but Jordan can flash that winning smile as well as knock out you out in a fight, and he absolutely reinvigorates what could have been a stock character.

Saoirse Ronan Brooklyn

Eilis Lacey is an Irish shop girl who moves from her small village to New York during the mid-1950s to pursue her dreams, but Saoirse Ronan transcends such simplistic character outlines with a performance so true and attuned to the moment that John Crowley's pleasant drama achieves near greatness. It's a performance subtly encompassing timidity, fear, heartbreak, surprise, and joy--all in a single look. Ronan's face in closeup may in fact be the special effect of the year.

Peter Ferdinando Hyena

Moral ambiguity is the order of the day in Gerard Johnson's ultra-violent British gangster picture, and Peter Ferdinando exudes that push and pull quality between doing what's right and what's necessary as a narcotics officer in over his head. Sweaty, disheveled, and spending most of the film in a state of paranoia, Ferdinando brings a pent-up energy and combustible emotional range to an archetypal role.

Teyonah Paris Chi-Raq

Spike Lee's rowdy, impassioned plea to stop inner-city violence could have gone the way of cartoon farce, and though he certainly dabbles in those areas for comedic effect, Teyonah Paris's dazzling performance as Lysistrata keeps everything ground in a kind of emotional truth. She has to look spectacular (which she does), have a commanding presence (which she has in spades), and deliver dialogue in the form of verse with searing passion (which she accomplishes with aplomb). Her committed performance is at the center of a film reaching out it's hands in love while screaming from a pulpit in anger.

Rachel McKeon Homemakers

Visions of aimless millennial youth are a dime a dozen these days, but Colin Healey's debut feature captures the roving frustration, drunken restlessness, and emotional instability of that time in our lives by focusing on Rachel McKeon's punk rock musician, Irene. This is a no-holds-barred, reckless, and surprisingly poignant performance; brilliantly portraying a fragile, angry, and sarcastic young woman perhaps afraid that her tough girl facade is beginning to fade.

Rami Malek Da Sweet Blood of Jesus

While Chi-Raq is currently getting raves (and for good reason), this greatly underappreciated Spike Lee Joint contains many pleasures, chief of which is Rami Malek's winningly humorous turn as the personal assistant of Stephen Tyrone Williams's wealthy black anthropologist. Malek's off-kilter line delivery, hilarious facial reactions, and overall sweet-natured presence takes a stereotypical "background" role and enlivens it with real heart and soul.

Favorite Films of 2015

FAVORITE FILMS OF 2015

Another year down. Another crop of films obsessed over. This time, I decided to go against ranking things in a traditional list. Instead, I've simply compiled 15 of my favorite films and placed them in alphabetical order. All have given me cinematic pleasure throughout 2015. All are worth cherishing.


by Jericho Cerrona January 14, 2016


About Elly

Asghar Farhadi's masterful picture is both a gripping human drama and an intellectually probing critique of Iranian society, with one of the year's most most gut-wrenching sequences involving a missing child that's a tour-de-force of staging and movement. A subtle, tense, and emotionally devastating piece of work.

Amour Fou

Writer-director Jessica Hauser takes the skeletal real-life story of mentally ill playwright Heinrich von Kleist's obsession with Henriette Vogel and then drapes a daring black comedy over the bones. High privilege, repression, and aristocratic good manners; all deftly filmed in static long shots. A simultaneously provocative and humorous triumph.

Approaching the Elephant

Amanda Rose Wilder uses a fly-on-the wall approach in this non-linear documentary examining the 2007-2008 year at the Teddy McArdle Free School in New Jersey which effectively distills the difficulties of teaching young children the finer points of democracy. Troubling, illuminating, and often very funny.

Crimson Peak

A maximalist vision of 1940s Old Hollywood-influenced haunted house pictures and full-bodied gothic romance, Guillermo Del Toro's unabashed homage is one of the purest distillations of a filmmaker's vision brought to the big screen in quite some time. Jane Eyre, Arthur Conan Doyle, Frankenstein, Hitchcock, Kubrick's The Shining, Mario Bava, and Edgar Allen Poe all get thrown into a pot that's distinctly Del Toro; resulting in an unwieldy, rumbling beast of a movie spitting blood, snow, and nightmarish ghouls.

Gangs of Wasseypur

This is India's The Godfather; Anurag Kashyap's magnificently contained epic about familial ties, betrayal, and the societal conditions which create and nurture gangsters, spanning decades and entire lives from the 1940s to the 1990s. Despite it's gargantuan running time, the film rockets along spinning information, names, places, and moments of brutal violence with stunning precision.

Hard to be a God

A disorienting descent into madness, a deranged mutilation of proper civilization, and a flat-out masterpiece, Aleksei German's swan song is like watching Terry Gilliam trapped inside Tarkovsky's brain while Herzog whispers indecipherable mantras. An extraordinary synthesis of human barbarism and gallows humor strangling the past, present, and future into one gangrene-infested stew.

Jauja

Lisandro Alonso's bold experiment follows Viggo Mortensen's wandering Dane as he searches for his 15-year-old daughter across the 19th-century Patagonian wilderness. The sight of characters placed up against the beautiful savagery of the landscapes creates it's own kind of movie magic; creating an existential nightmare disguised as a minimalist Western.

The Kindergarten Teacher

Nadav Lapid's esoteric drama about the bond between a teacher and her 5-year-old pupil is a stark political statement about the nature of art in Israel as well as a contradictory tale straddling the line between exploitation and expression. Thought-provoking and controversial ideas are posed, but never concretely answered, giving the film a deeply haunting quality.

Lil' Quinquin

Originally filmed as a French TV miniseries, Bruno Dumont's singular achievement follows a bumbling detective trying to solve a small-town string of bizarre murders, but really, the film is about maintaining a strange tone; merging macabre comedy and visual gags with a sophisticated use of framing and literary references. The grotesque folly of man has seldom been so deftly achieved.

The Look of Silence

2013's jaw-dropping The Act of Killing would always be an impossible act to follow, but Joshua Oppenheimer hasn't so much made a sequel to that ground-breaking documentary as an extension of the same world. Here, he follows Adi Rukun, an optometrist who was born two years after the Indonesian genocide ended in 1966 as he interviews some of the killers who still remain in positions of power. The results are disturbing, revelatory, and deeply moving; giving a voice to the multitudes of nameless victims forgotten by time.

Mad Max: Fury Road

George Miller returns to the Mad Max franchise and proves that a 70-year-old auteur can deliver an insane action spectacle with a nifty feminist twist to boot. A gonzo thrill ride that comes out with all guns, spears, gears, spikes, and flame-thrower electric guitars blazing, and the best film released by a major studio in years. Believe the hype.

Mommy

Ferociously alive and brimming with the kind of passionate cinematic risk-taking only a 25-year-old filmmaker could muster, Xavier Dolan's latest is like witnessing raw exposed nerves and a bloody heart. Loud shouting matches, gaudy pop tunes, deeply committed performances, and artful filmmaking choices unsure, as Dolan unspools a sprawling story of the dysfunctional bond between mother and son, along with the helpful neighbor caught inside their chaotic undertow. Self-indulgent and overlong? Sure. But also emotionally wrenching and cinematically exhilarating.

A Poem is a Naked Person

Following country/blues musician Leon Russell during the height of his popularity in 1974, this rambling, gleefully stoned-drunk documentary from Les Blank was shelved from distribution for some 40 years. Though superficially a concert film, there's an obsession with Russell's motley clan of weirdos and rural Oklahomans surrounding the recording studio permeating every frame with off-kilter weirdness. An unforgettable distillation of a lost time and place.

Timbuktu

A protest film under the guise of an intensely powerful human drama, African filmmaker Abderrahmane Sissako creates a prism into which we witness a city overrun by Islamic fundamentalists who implement rigid rules onto the population. There's a rare balancing of opposing ideologies at work here--with poetry and humor being juxtaposed with moments of brutal violence and bigotry. A shrewd, upsetting, and essential viewing experience.

Time Out of Mind

Richard Gere plays a homeless man struggling to survive on the streets of New York City while hoping to reconnect with his estranged daughter, but don't let the odd casting choice keep you away from Oren Moverman's artful rendering of a complex issue. Shot with long lenses through refracted mirrors and windows, the stylistic choices here challenge the way we view the problem of homelessness by never announcing itself from a pulpit, but rather, by trapping us inside the headspace of a man whom society has given up on. An important film, contemplative in approach and powerful in restraint.


OTHER FILMS I LOVED THAT JUST MISSED THE CUT:

Entertainment, Queen of Earth, Phoenix, What We Do in the Shadows, Uncertain Terms, Salvation Army, Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem, Stations of the Cross, Futuro Beach, Buzzard

Favorite Albums of 2015

FAVORITE ALBUMS OF 2015

Another year down. Another crop of records obsessed over. This time, I decided to go against ranking things in a traditional list. Instead, I've simply compiled 15 of my favorite albums and placed them in alphabetical order. All have given me sonic pleasure throughout 2015. All are worth cherishing.


by Jericho Cerrona January 10, 2016


Alex Calder Strange Dreams

Like a more obscure Max DeMarco, Alex Calder makes warped pop music with hints of melody wrapped in an acid bath. An unsettling combination of VHS tape hiss and synth-pop wonder.

Chester Watson Summer Mirage

A 19-minute, 6 track EP might seem disappointing after the 18-year-old Florida rapper's 70-minute opus Tin Wooki dropped last year, but condensing ideas actually makes his abstract sound more palpable. Atmospheric production, bass-heavy beats, and stream-of-consciousness rhyming means this kid has some legitimate skills.

Gentleman Surfer Gold Man

Sacramento, CA weirdos make another blast of carefully calibrated, mostly instrumental madness after 2013's bizarro masterpiece Blaks with this spastic, demented, and unhinged gem that showcases some serious musical chops. Prog-rock that's way cooler than you and flaunts it.

It Only Gets Worse Christian Country Home

Alabama-based spoken word artist Matt Finney and Dutch musician Mories get bleak and daringly beautiful with this, their third collaboration; an immersive plunge into the realm of atonal glitches, analog synths, and despairing wordplay.

Kamasi Washington The Epic

A 10-piece jazz band, 32-piece orchestra and 20-member choir all tackling swing, funk, bebop, soul, orchestrated free-jazz as concocted by a 34-year-old jazz musician wunderkind. Ambitious, unwieldy, and utterly brilliant.

La Luz Weirdo Shrine

A gorgeous waltz through Dick Dale-inspired guitar licks, ambient organs, and dreamy vocals in the Shangri-las mode, all manned by producer/guitar maestro Ty Segall. More than simply "surf rock" pastiche.

Palmbomen II Palmbomen II

The latest brainchild from Neatherlands-based musician Kai Hugo (and friends) is a concept album revolving around The X-Files (yes, you heard that right). Wobbly, synth-driven 90s kitsch, done right.

Petite Noir La Vie Est Belle / Life is Beautiful

This extraordinary achievement from half-Angolan, half-Congolese musician Yannick Ilunga weaves African rhythms with 80s new wave and anthemic indie rock to give us something close to perfection.

The Pop Group Citizen Zombie

Pioneers of late 70s UK punk are back with a comeback few expected and even fewer thought would turn out this brilliant; a cacophonous, groove-heavy art-rock album that recalls Bowie in it's uncompromising mixture of strangeness and melodicism.

Protomartyr The Agent Intellect

Frontman Joey Casey shouts, slurs, and mutters his way through Protomarty's latest slab of gutter post-punk. If The Fall crawled out of the underbelly of Detroit, it would sound something like this.

Shamir Ratchet

The year's best summer jam record, bar none; an infectious mix of R & B, disco, house, and wonky pop, all carried along by 20-year-old Shamir Bailey with eccentric confidence.

Tal National Zoy Zoy

There's so much complex history running throughout the undulating percussion and graceful vocals in this album that signifiers such "world music" feel extremely narrow. Based out of Niger and utilizing elements of Afro-beat, desert blues, and West African call-and-response, Zoy Zoy is musically dense, consistently pleasurable, and always full of life.

Viet Cong Viet Cong

Taking the basement-dwelling lo-fi aesthetic of last year's Cassette and then blowing it up to new levels of sonic brilliance. Think little dabs of Joy Division, Wire, and Guided by Voices along with the Calvary post-punkers usual habit of atonal racket, feedback-drenched noise, and monotone vocals.

Wand Golem

This thing gets heavier, dreamier, doomier, and more epic as it sludges along. Pure psych-metal with elements of Brian Eno and T. Rex thrown in to balance out the bong smoke. It's Cave-In getting into a bathroom brawl with The Melvins and Sabbath! And of course, Ty Segall is involved.

Young Fathers White Men are Black Men Too

Recorded on-the-fly in apartments and hotel rooms, this is the year's most boldly left-field hip-hop album, if one can even label it as such. A patchwork of spontaneous outbursts and layered experimentation.

10 Under-The-Radar Indies From 2015 You May Have Missed

by Jericho CerronaNovember 27, 2015

Doomsdays

Eddie Mullins' feature debut takes an unnerving scenario-- two aimless drifters (Justin Rice and Leo Fitzpatrick, respectively) wandering around the Catskills breaking into luxury country homes-- and then makes a hilariously deadpan comedy out of it. The film is meticulous without being arch, funny without pandering for cheap laughs, and most surprising of all, wistfully melancholic.

Man From Reno

Moody, patient, and steeped in neo-noir traditions; director Dave Boyle's Man From Reno manages to tell a fascinating whodunnit while maintaining an atmospheric sense of strangeness. Ayako Fujitani is superb as a displaced detective novelist caught up in the disappearance and possible murder of a handsome stranger, and Pepe Serne plays the local town sheriff with genuine naturalism. The city of San Francisco, meanwhile, hasn't felt this mysterious since Hitchcock's Vertigo.

Timbuktu

This extraordinary achievement from African filmmaker Abderrahmane Sissako is in many ways a protest film which also plays as an intensely powerful drama. Set in the titular Malian city overrun by Islamic fundamentalists who implement absurdly rigid rules on the population-- no football, no music, women must wear gloves selling fish at the market-- the film achieves a rare balanced view of opposing ideologies. There's poetry, brutality, and even humor here; made all the more palpable by Sissako's refusal to spoon-feed the audience easy answers.

Something Must Break

A beautiful, elegiac, uncompromising piece of work, Ester Martin Bergsmark's love story between a male transitioning into a female and a straight man, takes us further into the complicated nature of identity and gender than most films would ever dare. Though the tale of Sebastian/ Ellie (Saga Becker in a remarkable performance) pining for charming Andreas (Iggy Malmborg) is nothing new; the film's daring perspective and Bergsmark's poetic direction makes it vital.

The Kindergarten Teacher

There's something boldly esoteric about this Israeli drama from talented filmmaker Nadav Lapid (Policeman). Centering around the bond between a kindergarten teacher in Tel Aviv (played in a nuanced performance by Sarit Larry) and her 5-year-old pupil (a staggeringly natural Avi Shnaidman), the film is a stark political statement about the nature of art in Israel, as well as a deeply contradictory tale about the line between exploitation and expression. Above all, Lapid's work maintains a tone of uneasy oddness; refusing to offer up an ultimate meaning, and therefore, much more intriguing because of it.

Five Star

Though perhaps a step down after 2013's hauntingly elegiac Welcome To Pine Hill, writer-director Keith Miller's latest nonetheless showcases a rare sensitivity to a milieu long overcrowded with stereotypes. Like Miller's previous work, Five Star takes a blurring of documentary and real-life approach to tell the story of gang leader Primo (James Grant, playing a version of himself) and his mentoring of young teenager John (John Diaz). Less about plot than mood and texture, the familiarity of the narrative is overshadowed by Grant's powerful performance and Miller's mingling of naturalism with scripted developments. A slow-burn drama that quietly sneaks up on you.

The Mend

Buried within abstract editing, ingenious framing, and an off-beat score is a touching story of brotherly love disguised as self-destructive dysfunction in writer-director John Magary's debut feature. Josh Lucas plays a scruffy, near homeless asshole wandering the streets of NYC who crashes a party hosted by his brother (Stephen Plunkett), and the results are absolutely unpredictable. Magary's direction often recalls a younger Paul Thomas Anderson, with a compositional assuredness that gives the film a singular off-kilter energy.

Fort Tilden

Girls meets Frances Ha by way of the uncomfortableness of See You Next Tuesday, filmmakers Sarah-Violet Bliss and Charles Rogers have tapped into a prevalent trend in the current zeitgeist; that of the self-obsessed, delusional millennial. The tale of two NY friends (Bridley Elliot and Clare McNulty, respectively) whose plans to travel to a beach for a meetup with some hipster guys quickly escalates into a series of misadventures which tellingly never allow the character's insecurities off the hook. The results are funny, cringe-inducing, and ultimately, oddly touching.

Prince

Dutch filmmaker Sam de Jong's debut tells the story of a Dutch-Moroccan teenager (affable newcomer Ayoub Elasri) fighting off boredom with his friends, pining for the unattainable blonde beauty, and falling in with a psychotic madman while living in an impoverished suburb of Amsterdam. Though there's a predictable narrative framework at play here, de Jong's stylish direction, a throbbing synth score, atypical locations, and unorthodox performances makes this an exhilarating addition to the coming-of-age genre.

Heaven Knows What

There's nothing safe or cuddly about Benny and Josh Safdie's unrepentantly bleak depiction of drug-addicted teenagers on the streets of NYC. Mixing trained actors with nonprofessionals in a swirling mosaic of squalor, the film simply asks that we observe it's characters rather than attempt to empathize with them. Arielle Holmes, a non-actor with real-life ties to the subject matter, casts a haunting spell as Harley, and she's backed up by some memorable supporting turns from Caleb-Landry Jones as Holmes' manipulative lover (the only "real" actor of note here) and Buddy Duress as her drug dealer. The evocative cinematography and brooding analog synth score, meanwhile, add to the sense of poetic hopelessness.

Best Performances of 2014

An impressive year in terms of technical achievement (Boyhood, Birdman, et al), 2014 also showcased some of the best acting in recent memory. Most of my favorite performances didn't exactly follow the "Oscar-ready" format, but were rather idiosyncratic turns in films that either broke cinematic rules or simply paved the way for interesting conversations. Instead of categorizing them in terms of "lead" and "supporting", I've simply listed them as complete feats of thespian greatness. So, without further ado, here are 10 amazing performances that deserve to be fawned over!

by Jericho Cerrona February 9, 2015

SCARLETT JOHANSSON Under The Skin
Scarlett Johansson's revelatory turn as an alien being sent to collect male specimens in Jonathan Glazer's extraordinary sci-fi parable is a performance utilizing understated facial expressions and a vacant stare to brilliant effect. An unfussy, understated performance so effectively detached it may largely go unnoticed, proving Johansson as more than just a pretty face.
ELEANORE PIENTA See You Next Tuesday
There's a streak of psychological horror running throughout Drew Tobia's black comedy that's reinforced by Eleanore Pienta's brashly committed performance as Mona, a 20-something pregnant train-wreck living in Brooklyn. A bold and at times alienating embodiment of a woman trapped inside her own body, Pienta reveals layers of self-doubt and insecurity that creates an emotionally devastating impact.
TESSA THOMPSON Dear White People
As Sam, the tenacious DJ who runs the button-pushing titular radio show in Justin Simien's razor-sharp debut about racial tolerance, Tessa Thompson is absolutely luminous, giving her fiercely intelligent character a wounded vulnerability that simmers beneath a sarcastic veneer. A star-making performance if there ever was one; simultaneously confident and fragile.
ELISABETH MOSS Listen Up Phillip
One of director Alex Ross Perry's most incisive decisions in his acidic satire about egotistical New York writers is to break the narrative up halfway through to focus on Elisabeth's Moss long-suffering girlfriend. Though Jason Schwartzman is pitch-perfect as a narcissistic wannabe Philip Roth stand-in, Moss is ultimately the heart of the film; bringing pangs of vulnerability to the role and in one particularly jaw-dropping scene, staging a tour-de-force of conflicting emotions that hits you right in the gut.
MIRA BARHAMMER, LIV LEMOYNE, MIRA GROSIN We Are The Best!
Three stand-out performances from child actors is a rarity, but what's even more impressive about the trio of pubescent girls in Lukas Moodysson's adorable coming-of-age romp is just how natural and winning they are without ever being cloying. There's nothing contrived about the work of Barhammer, Grosin, and leMoyne here; just a tactile sense of playfulness, tension, and female camaraderie that's always attune to the moment.
GABBY HOFFMAN Lyle
In Stewart Thorndike's creepily effective feminist twist on Rosemary's Baby, Gabby Hoffman plays a pregnant woman whose mental state is deteriorating due to past trauma. A bundle of frayed nerves, paranoia, and heightened emotions, Hoffman is in nearly every frame and absolutely commands the screen; never devolving into over-acting or cheap "horror"-esque melodrama. Instead, her motherly sense of fear is intensely unnerving and surprisingly moving.
GINA PIERSANTI It Felt Like Love
Showcasing both the awkwardness of sexual awakening as well as the possible dangers of growing up too fast, Gina Piersanti's acting debut in Eliza Hittman's lyrical coming-of-age tale is a revelation. Piersanti is so adept at projecting both a yearning for acceptance as well as confusion regarding her sexual urges, that her performance ultimately takes on a heartbreaking dimension that lingers.
MARION COTILLARD The Immigrant / Two Days, One Night
As a Polish native forced into prostitution in James Gray's intimate epic The Immigrant, Marion Cotillard uses her haunted gaze in order to distill the confusion, fear, and torment of coming to America with no prospects. It's a great performance made up mostly of gestures and held in the eyes; while in The Dardenne's social drama Two Days, One Night, she is similarly heartbreaking as a factory owner fighting to keep her job. If 2015 was indeed the year of Eisenberg, Marion Cotillard easily takes top honors on the female side.
PIERRETTE ROBITAILLE, ROMANE BOHRINGER Vic + Flo Saw A Bear
Playing the titular female loves in Denis Côté's unnerving domestic drama, Pierrette Robitaille and Romane Bohringer deliver indelible performances that are noteworthy for portraying women of a certain age in complex terms. Their co-dependent relationship is the heart of the film; with Robitaille revealing Vic as a haunted, deeply damaged individual and Bohrringer giving the younger Flo shades of wounded fragility. No matter how far Côté goes to mess with genre, it's these two performances that hold the whole thing together.
HADEWYCH MINIS Borgman
As a frazzled mother who feels pity (or middle-class guilt) for a bearded homeless man seeking to take a bath in her upscale home, Hadewych Minis effortlessly becomes an audience conduit in Alex van Warmerdam's deadpan black satire. Going through a variety of emotions; concern, confusion, fear, desire etc, Minis creates a wholly devastating portrait of a woman suffocated by bourgeoisie complacency.

Best Performances of 2014

An impressive year in terms of technical achievement (BoyhoodBirdman, et al), 2014 also showcased some of the best acting in recent memory. Most of my favorite performances didn't exactly follow the "Oscar-ready" format, but were rather idiosyncratic turns in films that either broke cinematic rules or simply paved the way for interesting conversations. Instead of categorizing them in terms of "lead" and "supporting", I've simply listed them as complete feats of thespian greatness. So, without further ado, here are 10 amazing performances that deserve to be fawned over!

by Jericho Cerrona February 9, 2015

BRONTIS JODOROWSKY The Dance of Reality
Playing the role of Jaime Jodorowsky, the grandfather of cult filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky in this semi-autobiographical tale about growing up in Chile, Brontis Jodorowsky goes full meta as a Stalin-obsessed tyrant who rules with an iron fist. The performance is infused with pain, anger, and undercurrents of emotional insecurity; a larger-than-life, melodramatic turn in a film that absolutely requires it soar.
JOAQUIN PHOENIX Inherent Vice
As stoner P.I. Doc Sportello in Paul Thomas Anderson's faithful adaptation of Thomas Pynchon's 2009 novel Inherent Vice, Joaquin Phoenix gives the loosest, most warmly resonant performance of his career. Moments of broad comedy are broken up by subtle reactions and half-muttered ramblings of a man desperately trying to keep up with the spiraling red herrings of the narrative-defying plot; all delivered in a brilliant state of stoned euphoria.
RALPH FIENNES The Grand Budapest Hotel
Ralph Fiennes is an absolute hoot as wealthy concierge Gustave H. in Wes Anderson's lively ode to 30s screwball farce; giving us a mischievous gentlemen out of step with his time. Fienne's way with a razor-sharp quip and knack for physical comedy is completely in tune with Anderson's playful direction, resulting in the year's most purely enjoyable performance.
TIMOTHY SPALL Mr. Turner
Timothy Spall's performance as British painter J.M.W. Turner in Mike Leigh's sprawling biopic is absolutely miraculous; a series of grunts, grimaces, and odd facial expressions that also makes room for startling emotional beats. Rather than play the enigmatic Turner in the kind of "Oscar-baiting" traditional manner, Spall gives us a warts and all depiction; full of self-loathing, sexual deviance, and a social awkwardness that transcends whatever preconceived notions we might have about troubled artists.
ED RYAN Soft in the Head
As Maury, a halfway house leader in Nathan Silver's fly-on-the-wall mosaic of being young and reckless in Brooklyn, Ed Ryan delivers a tender and empathetic performance that offsets the film's overall swirl of chaotic emotion. Ultimately, Ryan's work as a kind-hearted caregiver to those society has given up on is so naturalistically organic, that it's impossible not to be moved.
JESSE EISENBERG The Double / Night Moves
In Kelly Reichardt's slow-burn eco-terrorist/humanist drama Night Moves, Jesse Eisenberg gave the year's eeriest depiction of a sociopath (sorry Jake Gyllenhaal), while in Richard Ayoade's dark satire The Double, he combined the dickish confidence displayed in The Social Network with the nebbish timidity from The Squid and The Whale for a dual role of comedic/dramatic brilliance. 2014 may just have been the year of Eisenberg.
MACON BLAIR Blue Ruin
Writer/director Jeremy Sauliner's tightly constructed revenge thriller made waves on the festival circuit and for good reason, but much of that success is due to Macon Blair's terrific central performance as Dwight; a homeless man reeling from past trauma who takes it upon himself to exact revenge on a scuzzy redneck just released from prison. Unlike most genre movie protagonists, Blair plays Dwight as a lost soul simply trying to retain his sanity; an emotionally fraught, tense, steely-eyed piece of acting that completely upends expectations.
DAVID OYELOWO Selma
Ava DuVernay's searing portrait of a pivotal moment in the civil rights movement could have gone the way of the mawkish biopic route if the central performance wasn't on point, but David Oyelowo's performance as Martin Luther King Jr. is a wholly committed, towering achievement. The difficulty of crafting a vision of King that lives up to his magnetic presence is daunting, but Oyelowo brings various shades to the role; going beyond mere mimicry and giving us a fully-dimensional, flawed, but still entirely inspiring personality.
JACK O'CONNELL Starred Up
Jack O' Connell gives a tremendous, star-making performance as a violate 19-year-old transferred to an adult prison in David MacKenzie's unflinching prison drama. Cocky, aggressive, intense, and at times emotionally vulnerable, O' Connell gives us a vision of undisciplined youthful rage that never feels contrived or manipulative. A superlative piece of work that should skyrocket the actor to the stratosphere.
MICHAEL FASSBENDER Frank
The idea of casting a magnetic actor known for his good looks and thespian ability and then shielding his face under a papier-mâché helmet is a risky one, but Lenny Abrahamson does just that with Michael Fassbender in his disarming film Frank. As the elusive ringleader of a band of avant-garde musicians, Fassbender creates the year's most beguiling character. A physical, endearing, bizarre, and ultimately, extremely moving performance.

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

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UNDER THE SKIN
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

Previous 3. Next
INHERENT VICE
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

Previous 4. Next
WHIPLASH
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

Previous 5. Next
CITIZENFOUR
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

Previous 6. Next
STARRED UP
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

Previous 7. Next
NORTE, THE END OF HISTORY
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

Previous 8. Next
A SUMMER'S TALE
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

Previous 9. Next
THE MISSING PICTURE
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

Previous 10. Next
SOFT IN THE HEAD
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Armando's Favorite 25 Films of 2014

Armando Rivera, the most even-keeled member of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST is a man with an uncanny knack for snoozing during pivotal moments of celebrated films and whose much-repeated refrain "Cool movie" became the catchphrase of the year. His list of 25 favorites from 2014 are bold, varied, and evocative; much like Mr. Rivera himself.

by Armando Rivera February 1, 2015

FILMS 25-11 Next
25 DEAR WHITE PEOPLE


24 WRINKLES


23 THE DANCE OF REALITY


22 THE HOMESMAN


21 IT FELT LIKE LOVE


20 WETLANDS


19 THE RAID 2


18 THE WIND RISES


17 VIC + FLO SAW A BEAR


16 BORGMAN


15 WE ARE THE BEST!


14 INTERSTELLAR


13 A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT


12 STRANGER BY THE LAKE


11 A FIELD IN ENGLAND
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Christian’s Favorite 25 Films of 2014

As the resident host of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST, Christian Estabrook went on a Herculean screening binge of epic proportions and this variety is reflected in his 25 favorite films of 2014. A proponent of strong female leads, independently-minded success stories, and cinematic racial tolerance, Mr. Estrabrook's list is guaranteed to make your eyeballs quiver with filmic ecstasy.

by Christian Estabrook February 1, 2015

Previous 1. Next
UNDER THE SKIN

25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Christian’s Favorite 25 Films of 2014

As the resident host of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST, Christian Estabrook went on a Herculean screening binge of epic proportions and this variety is reflected in his 25 favorite films of 2014. A proponent of strong female leads, independently-minded success stories, and cinematic racial tolerance, Mr. Estrabrook's list is guaranteed to make your eyeballs quiver with filmic ecstasy.

by Christian Estabrook February 1, 2015

Previous 2. Next
THE MISSING PICTURE
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Christian’s Favorite 25 Films of 2014

As the resident host of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST, Christian Estabrook went on a Herculean screening binge of epic proportions and this variety is reflected in his 25 favorite films of 2014. A proponent of strong female leads, independently-minded success stories, and cinematic racial tolerance, Mr. Estrabrook's list is guaranteed to make your eyeballs quiver with filmic ecstasy.

by Christian Estabrook February 1, 2015

Previous 3. Next
INHERENT VICE
25-11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Christian’s Favorite 25 Films of 2014

As the resident host of THE THIRD ACT PODCAST, Christian Estabrook went on a Herculean screening binge of epic proportions and this variety is reflected in his 25 favorite films of 2014. A proponent of strong female leads, independently-minded success stories, and cinematic racial tolerance, Mr. Estrabrook's list is guaranteed to make your eyeballs quiver with filmic ecstasy.

by Christian Estabrook February 1, 2015

Previous 5. Next
SELMA
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