SPELLLING

 

Mazy Fly

8

Like an alien falling to earth

by Jericho Cerrona

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The witching hour is upon us, and Oakland-based artist Tia Cabral will be acting as high priestess. As the mastermind behind SPELLLING, Cabral is carving out a niche for herself in the burgeoning Bay Area underground electronic music scene by inviting listeners to her sonic seance and then casting them out into the darkness. If her 2017 debut, Pantheon of Me, used warm synths and sultry balladry to conjure an intimate feeling, then Mazy Fly opens things up to a wider array of experimentation. Songs are built around vintage keyboard sounds, drum machine, and spacey effects, but Cabral’s voice remains as beguiling as ever. The overall atmosphere is gothic (perhaps even witchy), but also sexy, scary, and soothing. It’s an album for weirdos, lovers, and seekers.

The spiritual longing anchoring SPELLLING’s music makes it into a kind of prayer where mysticism and carnal human desire coexist. There are many influences colliding here— Italian progressive synth-based band Goblin, the glitchy electronica of Apex Twin, Erykah Badu’s style of R & B Afrofuturism, Brian Eno, 90’s IDM, Kate Bush—but Cabral has a distinct sound which reaches back into the past while imagining a new future.

On songs like “Haunted Water”, with it’s icy retro synth leads and cooing vocals, and the occultic “Hard to Please”, which sounds like it was recorded inside the belly of a cathedral, SPELLLING taps into something almost supernatural while never forfeiting base desires. Elsewhere, the album goes into ambient territory with “Melted Wings”, which uses a wandering sax and Vangelis-esque keyboards to conjure an atmosphere of sadness, while the opening moments of “Afterlife” has a chintzy sci-fi vibe complete with an elevated theremin intro.

This isn’t all doom and gloom, though. “Under the Sun” plays like a slowed down warped disco track which actually points toward hope for the human race. Cabral gets into more outsider territory with “Real Fun”, in which she paints the picture of two aliens looking for a good time. There are references to Billie Holiday and Michael Jackson, but the song eventually moves away from bliss into a crescendo-filled outro filled with apocalyptic synth lines and pounding drums.

Mazy Fly is a record which gradually worms its way into your bones. Cabral is constantly trying out new avenues with her voice; overlapping, layering, and placing them at fascinating sonic intersections. With all of the electronic buzzing and wonky synth passages, it would have been tempting for her to blow out the production, but she leaves enough space within the recordings to inject haunting melodies. If Mazy Fly is indeed the place to make contact with the dead, then SPELLING ultimately seems more interested in the land of the living; wrapped up in dreams, fantasy, and hope for a better world.